Friday Fiction Feature: The Big Book of Sherlock Holmes Stories

A little mystery for your holiday season?

FictionReboot2Otto Penzler’s latest edited anthology for Black Lizard and Vintage Crime is a treat for Sherlockians. Just in time for Christmas — and the long-awaited Christmas special, if you’re a fan of the BBC Sherlock reboot series — is a doorstop of a Holmes anthology, The Big Book of Sherlock Holmes Stories, featuring everything from parody to the supernatural to straight-up homage.

Continue reading “Friday Fiction Feature: The Big Book of Sherlock Holmes Stories”

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A Study in Spenzer: Cleveland’s Sherlock

ForenscisSmallAs many of you know, I have been working for the past year on the archive of John George Spenzer, toxicologist and forensic expert in Cleveland Ohio (1864-1932). Today, I would like to introduce the intrepid student who has been assisting in this research, Elizabeth Fregoso. In today’s post, she gives us a wonderful tour through that archive in A Study in Spenzer: an Evening of Amateur Deductions. Welcome Elizabeth!

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A Study in Spenzer
Elizabeth Fregoso

My experience working with the Spenzer collection and thoughts/ analysis on his personal effects.

During my most recent year at university, I had the great fortune of spending lots of quality time with renowned forensic toxicologist and professor of chemistry and medicine at Case Western Reserve University, none other than Dr. John George Spenzer.

That is to say, I rummaged through his belongings and catalogued them in as much painstakingly personal detail as possible. Spenzer himself died in 1932.

But allow me to explain! This opportunity came unexpected, by way of an article I discovered online about a fantastic exhibit entitled “Forensic Science, Sherlock, and Steampunk” showing at the Dittrick Medical History Museum. I found this article while I was rather vainly entering the search term “ ‘Sherlock Holmes’ ‘Case Western Reserve University’ “ into Google in an effort to find some interesting Sherlockian attractions near campus. I should mention that I am an aspiring Baker Street Irregular and actually celebrate January 6th in an entirely ‘un-ironic’ fashion, so naturally, I’m pretty interested in anything related to this particular interest.

The next day, I trekked out to check out this exhibit. If you haven’t yet been, the exhibit contains a collection of various medical and Victorian artifacts with a focus on the evolution of forensic science around the turn of the 20th century, and I HIGHLY recommend visiting the museum next time you’re in town. While perusing it closely I was lucky to meet the inestimable Dr. Brandy Schillace, who introduced me to the doctor personally in the form of numerous amusing anecdotes and plenty of odd and intriguing similarities between Spenzer and Sherlock. Interest piqued, it was about a week later when I returned to the museum and at the invaluable suggestion of my first-year advisor inquired into an undergraduate research position. On getting hired, little did I suspect that I was just beginning a fascinating and intimate association with this incredible man.

I can indeed confirm that it was just as Dr. Schillace said: time and time again I was reminded of the Great Detective while going through Spenzer’s things. He kept a bunch of commonplace books where he stored information he found relevant – he was intensely involved in the subject of crime and followed it closely –he was occasionally a bit of a ‘sassmaster’ — sometimes I couldn’t even tell which of the two was the one cramping the other’s style. It was this inextricable linking that gave me the idea to have a little fun while I was going through Spenzer’s notes – Sherlocking about a little, if you will. I decided to put my skills of deduction to the task of building up a sort of idea of the man. What follows is my attempt to apply Sherlock’s own methods to my examination of Spenzer’s belongings, and deliver a brief analysis on the character of the man behind the infallibly well-groomed moustache, Dr John George Spenzer.

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Spenzer_cane_5x7.5Born in 1864, Spenzer had quite the drive to achieve, even from a young age. Though he was born in the United States, he moved to Germany at 15 years old, when American law at the time deemed him too young to obtain his degree. He completed his education abroad and, from there, he moved to Cleveland and became a professor at what is now Case Western Reserve University. It was while here that he became known as “Cleveland’s Sherlock Holmes”, having a hand in multiple sensational criminal trials. Among his achievements were providing definitive evidence in the 1916 trial of Josh Kiser as well as identifying toxic chemicals in the Cuyahoga River that led directly to federal efforts to understand pollution during an age when many companies were permitted to use rivers as industrial waste dumps.

The majority of the Spenzer collection that I interacted with was composed of notes on printed-slides-3_8x5various topics relevant to Spenzer’s known areas of expertise: medical jurisprudence and forensic investigation. All the material were contained in binder upon forest-green binder and on paper so thin it could have been used for tracing. Most of the copied articles were excerpted from published textbooks; the one he favored most seemed to be Eduard Von Hofmann’s Atlas of Legal Medicine. Apparently, Spenzer was a man on a mission to catalogue everything that piqued his curiosity, a continual quest to hone his skills and build on his professional knowledge. There must have been about 100 pages per binder per subject, and there were even accompanying illustrations. In watercolor.

Title Page_cropPretty impressive, eh?

Well, clearly he thought so too, because he went a long way in convincing his readers (or maybe just convincing himself) that he was striving for nothing less than perfection. Check this out: in many of the binders and positioned before all the content, there was a manufacturer’s tag clipped in the very front firmly attesting to the “mechanical perfection” of the binders.

How’s that for some old-fashioned, passive-aggressive vanity?

As for the content itself: Spenzer collected miscellanea on a variety of topics that today would be intimately familiar to any forensic scientist. Fingerprinting, ballistics, hangings, drownings, electrocution… just a handful of the subjects he collected materials on. Though I haven’t cataloged it yet, there was an entire binder on the infamous Rasor trial. A sensational case for its time, Guy Rasor was accused of murdering his lover, Ora Lee. It was a case in which Spenzer was personally involved as an expert witness – and enjoyed making the ‘expert’ part known, especially. Take a look at this exchange, which I transcribed from a photo I took in order to use as a reaction image whenever I thought a friend was wrong about something in a text conversation:

 

SPENZER: A heart-shaped piece was cut out of the right-hand pocket.

ATTORNEY: And by whom?

SPENZER: By myself. From this point below and posterior to the left-hand pocket a rhombohedral piece was removed.

JUDGE: Will you put it in United States, Doctor?

SPENZER: A rhombohedral, your Honor, is a certain, definite shape, like a square is a shape, or a rectangle.

ATTORNEY: The trouble is we don’t understand that, Doctor.

SPENZER: A faulty education.

 

I’m definitely no Sherlock Holmes, but I’ll go out on a limb here and deduce from this particular exchange that Spenzer could be a bit of a Holmesian know-it-all when he wanted to be.

I did get to catalogue an entire binder on the Crippen trial, a case in which Spenzer was not directly involved. You wouldn’t think it though; from the sheer amount of materials he collected on this trial’s proceedings, he was certainly an interested third party. Doctor Harvey Crippen is accused of murdering his then-wife Cora and disposing of her body in the basement. The two expert witnesses in the case are entirely at odds about what the chemical evidence means. In fact, much of the transcript Spenzer had on record was argument on each scientist’s methodology, as the judge and attorneys attempted to figure out how two radically different conclusions could be reached from the same evidence.

This binder stood out to me. Unlike the other binders, it wasn’t just a collection of useful and interesting tidbits. It was one of only two I had gone through – the other being “The Forensic Detection of Blood” — that appeared to be set up as a textbook, complete with a table of contents, multiple sources, and original commentary. Of course, much of this commentary was thinly veiled criticisms of the investigators involved and laments on how, if it were him on the case, he would have done things differently. But the main idea is that much of the language was directed at a third party, as if someone were meant to read these notes in the future as instructive exercises on chemical toxicology, and its limits. It would seem not all of the work was private; some of it was meant as a field guide for future generations of forensic scientists.

A last feature of note: nearly every entry had hand drawn ink and watercolor illustrations accompanying them – save for those with parent articles that had none. These illustrations came in either color or in black and white, but were always copied meticulously from the source material. In my opinion, the most charming of these illustrations wOhio-vs-Murray7x5ere the ones on the spines of each binder, indications of the specific binder’s subject materials. With little touches like that, beginning an impressive new tome always gave me the definite feel of cracking open an actual textbook.

A name commonly showed up alongside these illustrations: “Louis Karnosh”, about whom surprisingly little can be found on Google, besides that he was a practicing MD in the Cleveland area around Spenzer’s time and was 44 by the time of the 1940 census. It’s fairly reasonable to assume that he was involved in the reproduction of these images somehow – possibly Spenzer did the lineart and Karnosh supplied the watercolors? In any case, there’s no confirmation on what role he played exactly, but the pictures are quite detailed and, despite showing graphic images of violent crimes, are rather beautiful. However Dr. “Louis Karnosh” of Cleveland was involved, he deserves a little bit of the limelight.

Speaking of the limelight, it is here that we may be witness to a rare expression of humility on the part of our good Dr. Spenzer: deferring a portion of his personal, work-related project onto someone with known skill that he considered worthy of inclusion in his Perfection Collection. As anxious as he was to make his own expertise known – and not without good reason, of course — he was not above acknowledging the skill and expertise of others.

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So, to conclude my Study in Spenzer, as it were: here we have a chemist and forensic investigator of note—sharp as a tack, dedicated to his studies, and deeply invested in his work on both a professional and a personal level. A perfectionist and concerned with high standards of presentation, he worked tirelessly to ensure that his methods were reliable and his records flawless, as seen in his immense dedication to keeping commonplace books to paste newspaper abstracts and transcripts for reference. Despite being somewhat standoffish and arrogant, Spenzer was readily able to recognize and acknowledge the unique talents of those around him. He was also anxious to have a hand in influencing future forensic scientists, both in the classroom and on the page. In conclusion, Spenzer was a highly intelligent and motivated man, and all of his efforts in the field of forensic science were taken up with the aim of more easily and efficiently getting to the truth, serving justice, and keeping the peace in common society.

Sound like someone else you might know?

I thought so, too.

Holmes_chem_9x9ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTOR
Elizabeth Fregoso is an undergraduate engineering student at Case Western University and currently lives in Parma, OH. She takes special interest in true crime, behavioural science, and chemistry, and her dream is to find (or invent!) a job in which she can indulge a combined interest in storytelling, imagination, and problem-solving on a daily basis. She enjoys filling rare moments of spare time with gourmet sodas, free online courses, and copious amounts of Sherlockiana.

MedHum Monday Presents: A Review of Skeleton Crew

FictionReboot2Welcome back to MedHum Monday! Today we present a review of Skeleton Crew by Deborah Halber, science writer for MIT. Taking a good look at forensics history, but also at how technology today helps to re-open unsolved cases, the book invites us to question what counts as expertise in a modern, digital world.

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Deborah Halber’s The Skeleton Crew: How Amateur Sleuths are Solving America’s Coldest Cases (2014, Simon & Schuster)
Review by Danielle Nielsen

indexDeborah Halber’s The Skeleton Crew: How Amateur Sleuths are Solving America’s Coldest Cases (2014, Simon & Schuster) explores the networks of part-time Internet detectives who use databases, missing person reports, and often gut instincts to identify decades-old unidentified bodies. Alongside these part-time sleuths are the law enforcement agencies and officers, from local police to coroners to state forensic anthropologists, saddled with the remains but often hesitant to work the public to solve these cases.

Halber’s interest in the Skeleton Crew stems from a May 2010 news story in The Boston Globe that included a sketch of the Lady of the Dunes, a young, unidentified female victim, found in the mid-1970s in Provincetown, Massachusetts. In her own Internet research about the Lady of the Dunes, Halber discovered a network of websites populated by photographs, drawings, and clay and digital re-creations of unidentified bodies and their faces, networks that Halber deemed “a Facebook for the dead.” Halber’s driving question of the book, “Who, I wondered, would go out of their way to create or peruse an Internet morgue?” led her to discover those people, the Skeleton Crew, who spend their available hours perusing these Internet morgues looking to identify these bodies.

Through fifteen chapters, a prologue, and epilogue, Halber deftly interweaves stories about unidentified bodies and the civilians or citizen-investigators who have helped identify remains. The framing narrative for Halber’s investigations is Tent Girl, a young woman whose body was found in eastern Kentucky on May 17, 1968, by Wilbur Riddle, a local well driller. She was wrapped in a tarp and dumped next to a major highway with no identification. Tent Girl would not receive a name or be returned to her family until April 1998 after Todd Williams, a Tennessee factory worker and Riddle’s son-in-law, devoted years searching for clues about Tent Girl’s identity. It was not, however, until the advent of the Internet and easily accessible and searchable databases that Williams would be able to solve the case.

In addition to the Lady of the Dunes and Tent Girl, we meet other unidentified persons and their Internet champions, and Halber chronicles the stories of the Doe Network, one of the most well-known sleuthing communities, the National Missing and Unidentified Missing Persons System, or NamUs, a site for which Todd Matthews now serves as an administrator, and dead sites like the Missing Persons Cold Case Network, Websleuths, and ColdCases.

Halber speaks not only only with the citizen-sleuths, but she also interviews government employees and law enforcement agents like Dr. Marcella Fierro, Virginia’s chief medical examiner and early pioneer and advocate for the unidentified; Mathew Hickman, a statistician for the Bureau of Justice Statistics tasked with determining the number of unidentified remains in the United States; and Mike Murphy, the Clark County, Nevada, coroner.

Home of Las Vegas, Clark County recovers ten thousand bodies every year, a number of which remain unidentified. In his role as coroner, Murphy posted the first government-issued website with photographs or drawings of the unidentified housed in the Clark County morgue, encouraging other states and municipalities to do so and allowing the Skeleton Crew to more effectively match missing persons with unidentified remains.

Part detective non-fiction, part ethnography, Halber introduces readers to a community that is not without its own internal drama. By the final chapters, we learn of the internal fights within the Doe Network over procedures concerning the ability to contact families and law enforcement officials. We understand the suspicious nature with which some law enforcement officials view members of the Skeleton Crew, both named and unnamed. We also see Todd Williams, an administrator for both Doe Network and NamUs overthrown at the Doe Network and banned from the community, as well as others rejected by their community members.

A science writer for MIT, Halber tells the story of these fascinating web sleuths, both humanizing the searchers and the unidentified remains, some of which, like the Lady of the Dunes, remain unidentified by the book’s end, and the scientific research and clear explanations resonate with a general audience. Halber’s Skeleton Crew reveals often unnoted or unnoticed citizens who devote countless hours to skimming missing person boards, looking through photographs and drawings, and using their instincts and research skills to make connections and return these bodies to their families.

About the Reviewer:
Danielle Nielsen is Assistant Professor of English at Murray State University where she teaches courses in composition and rhetoric, professional and technical writing, and British literature.