Book Review: Parasite

BookReviewLogoReview by Janette Edson

“Choose life. Choose Health. Choose SymboGen.”

Mira Grant (a pen name for American urban fantasy author Seanan McGuire) had her breakthrough with the three-part zombie series Newsflesh. She returns with the Parasitology series, starting with Parasite (Hatchette, 2013). And what a way to open the series, with a story that is combination of sleek corporate thriller and mind bending science. As a horror junkie obsessed with the most disgusting parasites, bugs and disease Grant’s new series, while a departure from her previous work, reflects of these passions.

13641105The story begins in 2027, and centres around Sally, who has miraculously recovered from a car accident that left her brain dead. Why has Sally recovered? Well it’s thanks to a tapeworm. Not any tapeworm, a worm that has been engineered so that instead of damaging its host heals and protects that individual.  The company SymboGen has developed this tapeworm that means you never need to worry about illness or medication again. SymboGen of course, has become a giant corporation, and nearly everyone on the planet who can afford a tapeworm has one. Continue reading “Book Review: Parasite”

Book Review: Rivers of London

BookReviewLogoRivers of London (retitled Midnight Riot in the US) is the first of Ben Aaronovitch’s Peter Grant books, a Pratchettian gambol through a London where magic is real and genus locii more lively than you might think. If you’re a classic Doctor Who fan, you might recognize Aaronovitch’s name as the writer of Remembrance of the Daleks and Battlefield, both stand-out episodes for the seventh Doctor.

9317452Rivers of London opens with PC Peter Grant on the beat with his fellow PC, Lesley May, and a murder. Grant and May are both nearing the end of their probationary periods as constables with the London Metropolitan police force, awaiting their permanent assignments to units within the Met. Lesley is confident of ending up somewhere she wants to be; Peter, particularly after he finds himself interviewing a ghost at the scene of the murder, less so. After his supernatural encounter, Peter is seconded to DCI Thomas Nightingale, the sole remaining practitioner of magic with the Met and sole resident of the Folly, the home of magic in London.

After that, things get odd.

The story is told by Peter who is quick, clever, and canny but by no means omnipotent or omniscient; the fallibility of his voice is refreshing, bringing the reader into closer sympathy with him. The murder mystery quickly turns dark as the deaths mount up; Aaronovitch has put thought into his system of magic and it is not without severe consequences for misuse or abuse. Alongside Peter, Lesley, and Nightingale, Aaronovitch has created a vivid and compelling cast of secondary characters, including the eponymous rivers, several ghosts, a lively terrier, and Nightingale’s housekeeper who is probably not as human as she appears to be.

Aaronovitch comes as close as any comic fantasy writer I know of to creating a world as involving, as frightening, and as funny as Terry Pratchett’s Discworld. And if you enjoy the first, there are currently five more titles in the series to immerse yourself in during the next summer heatwave.

Book Review: Wizard of the Crow

BookReviewLogoNgũgĩ wa Thiong´o´s tenth novel is a web of genres: A serendipitous persiflage of political narratives, a fantasy novel bordering on realism, and a love story about emancipation from patriarchy, capitalism and neocolonialism. It is also a novel about illness.

The story is set in the fictional Free Republic of Aburĩria on the African continent, whose autocratic Ruler came to power by violently building on the anti-Communist agenda of the West. In a post-colonial and post-Cold War environment, he struggles to keep his power among a shifting and weakening legitimacy. The Ruler´s struggle takes hold of his body through an illness, readily identified and patented for monetary gain by American medical professionals as SIE – Self Induced Expansion. His aides – three men proving their loyalty through body enhancements of eyes, ears, and mouth – face the limitation of Western medicine in New York City and call back home for help: the Wizard of the Crow is ordered to heal the Ruler. Continue reading “Book Review: Wizard of the Crow”